Category Archives: Art Publications

Landlord Colors

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Brenda Goodman, Self Portraits #1, #3 and #,4 (foreground); Addie Langford, BR Blue/#1 /LU (background). Landlord Colors installation.

I recently reviewed Landlord Colors for New Art Examiner. It’s a comprehensive overview of Detroit artists in a global context at Cranbrook Museum of Art in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. The exhibit advanced  a convincing argument that contemporary Detroit artists who have synthesized their unique, place-specific art from the substance of a distressed city have earned membership in an exclusive club of similarly inspired artists from around the world. To read the full review go here

 

Chicago’s New Art Examiner Covers Detroit

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Murals in the Market  painting by W.C. Bevan, sponsored by 1XRun

I recently wrote an article about the Detroit art scene for Chicago’s New Art Examiner,  focusing on three organizations/projects that seemed to me to exemplify important features of Detroit and its artists right now. 1XRun, Playground Detroit and the North End neighborhood’s American Riad project demonstrate the  entrepreneurial creativity, DIY energy, and artistic/social inclusiveness that I see in the city.  I’m sorry I couldn’t write about more of the Detroit’s great galleries and projects, but that would take a book, not a magazine article.  To read what I wrote, go here 

 

 

 

Pulp Covers Culture

multi-cultural-kids-group1Everybody knows that the mainstream print media is in trouble and that as a result, arts coverage in our region has dropped to near zero. But while the rest of us have been whining about the situation, the Ann Arbor Public Library  has done something about it.

Pulp, an online arts and cultural magazine, has started to fill the hole that was left when M-Live and others decided to pull the plug on arts reporting, with articles by some great writers like Patrick Dunn and Jenn McKee.

I just posted my first story on Pulp about the  Pop-X Art Festival and featuring  Ann Arbor Women Artists’ Side-By-Side, a community-based art project that crosses all lines of race, gender, age and disability to promote one-to-one connection. Check it out, and while you’re at it, take a look at some of the other coverage of music, theater and dance.

To investigate Pulp and what it has to offer, go here.