All posts by K.A. Letts

K.A. Letts is a painter living and working in the metro Detroit area.

Chuck Mintz Lustron Houses in KY

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Mr. Kahle, Defiance OH

Chuck Mintz will be showing 20 of his photographs of Lustron Houses at @PUBLIC, 131 W. Main Street, Louisville, KY 40202 (Whiskey Row Lofts, Second St. & W. Main St.) from February 27-March 28, 2015.  Opening is February 27, 5-7 p.m., Gallery Talk March 14, 12:00p.m.T he project is featured currently on Lenscratch:  http://lenscratch.com/2015/02/charles-mintz/.

Chuck Mintz  will be talking about the Lustron project on ArtxFM radio at noon on Friday, Feb. 27:  http://www.artxfm.com/listen/

For a video of the Lustrong House Project go to: http://bit.ly/1FxmlIa

 

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Margi Weir’s Drawings Now Showing in North Carolina, Texas, Maryland and Ohio

Margi Weir’s drawings are now showing in several exhibits around the U.S.:

  1. The 6th Annual Drawing Discourse, S. Tucker Cooke Gallery, University of North Carolina, Asheville, NC (juror: Val Britton, MFA from California College of the Arts ;1109 entries from 379 artists, 47 pieces selected)
  2.  49th Annual National Drawing and Small Sculpture Show, Del Mar College, Corpus Christi, TX (juror; Kurt Dyrhaug is an Associate Professor at Lamar University in Beaumont, TX) Weir received the Del Mar College Permanent Collection $1000 purchase award (shown above)
  3. 26th National Drawing and Print Exhibition, Notre Dame of Maryland University,Baltimore, MD
  4. Home, Fitton Center for Creative Arts, Hamilton, OH

David Eichenberg in Moldova

David Eichenberg (he of the hyper-realist portraits on aluminum in the TAA95 exhibit)  is currently in a show in Chisinau, Moldova at the Natural History Museum.
The show is called “An International Exhibition: The Figure as seen by the Eyes of Contemporary Artists” It is curated by Italian Hyper-realist Painter Giuseppe Muscio in conjunction with the Italian Embassy in Chisinau. It will run from the February 10 – 25, 2015. 

Call for Art in Detroit

For artists who are interested in finding out more about art in Detroit and possibly exhibiting there, here is a great opportunity: Hatch Art has just issued a call for entries to  Hatchback, an annual juried group show. The juror is Chido Johnson, Associate Professor at the College for Creative Studies and there is no fee. Hatch is a well respected non-profit gallery and studio space. Like most Detroit art venues, the gallery is open for limited hours but it is clean, well-lit, professionally run, and has a strong following within the city’s arts community. The deadline for entry is March 3.

I showed my work at Hatchback 8 last year, and it resulted in an invitation to show more extensively in TABLEAU: Hardin, Letts, Schaedig, currently on view until February 28.  The gallery is open this Saturday 1-6 and I will be on hand if anyone wants to come and scope it out.

For more information and to apply, go to: http://www.hatchart.org/hatchback

 

RCP Imaging for Artists in Portland MI

Like most artists, I have found a way in the past to make pictures of my work for use online at 72 dpi that I consider to be adequate, if not inspiring. I just take them outside on a bright overcast day, hang them on the barn door and photograph with my moderately good Panasonic DMC-F260 digital camera. After a little cropping and auto color correction with my rudimentary Adobe Elements program, I upload them to my website and that’s that.  This worked reasonably well when my largest painting was 3’ x 4’ but when it came to shooting my more recent, larger pieces I have found myself running into problems. The images of the larger pieces were flat and the colors oversaturated -even for use online at a low resolution- missing the rich detail of the originals.  They also were somewhat distorted on the edges.  So I was intrigued when I heard about RCP in Portland, Michigan, just west of Lansing. They claim to produce extremely high quality images from high resolution scans using their state-of the art equipment. They offered me a free scan to demonstrate, so I decided to try them out.

I arrived at their offices and met Keith Menne, who is in charge of scanning. He demonstrated the process on a painting I had brought. The scanner, which sits in its own large room, is a mammoth piece of equipment which reminded me of a cat-scan machine.  The bed is 4 x 6 feet which would allow most of my paintings to be scanned in one operation; larger pieces can be scanned and then “stitched” together to accommodate larger work. The machine’s lens is specially ground to eliminate distortion at the edges of the image.  The scan takes place in two passes.  In the first pass, the image is lined up for framing and focus; the second scan is image capture. The equipment is designed to get maximum surface detail and nuance as well as to reduce unwanted shadows and glare, and I must say that it did make a big difference with my work. Small variations in the thickness of the paint showed up much more clearly and the surface of the painting was cleanly represented. After the scan, Keith’s co-worker Jamie re-touched parts of the picture and he then produced 2 “color strips” to get the color just right.

rcp test strip  I didn’t proceed to a full print of the piece, but it was apparent that the process represented a huge improvement in the quality of the reproduced image.  RCP can print out images on a wide variety of papers, just about anything from fabric or canvas to fine art watercolor paper.

Of course, all this comes at a cost.  RCP charges $82.50 for an individual scan, or $330 an hour on the scanner.  They can scan 8-10 similarly sized images per hour, which makes the cost about $33 to $40 per scan.  Then there is the cost of paper and output which I didn’t get into with them.  Still, the product was impressive, and I think I will make use of their services when I make the step to producing fine art prints of my work. Anyone interested in more information can go to www.rcp-usa.com or contact Keith Menne directly: keith@rcp-usa.com.

I’d be interested in hearing from other artists about their experiences with any other scanning services in the region.

 

Chicago and Ann Arbor mentioned in Atlantic CityLab Report on the Arts

Yet another article on the economic importance of the arts.  We say it and say it, but is anyone listening?

Note the chart that indicates that Chicago, while hosting an important arts cluster,  is still less artcentric than its population should suggest.  Ann Arbor is listed as “punching above its weight” in the arts, but I hasten to add that this analysis includes all arts– not just visual arts– music, theater and the like.  My own personal experience in Ann Arbor indicates to me that the town is more supportive of performing arts and music than to visual arts.

http://bit.ly/1rZLPGU